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Courtyard of the Common Good

etr-gu:

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The common good: the expression must have been uttered threescore and ten times in the sessions of the Courtyard of the Gentiles event at Georgetown yesterday: a panel discussion about the common good and politics and one about the common good and the arts, each followed by a pair of…

Source: etr-gu
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Peter Matthiessen's Search

etr-gu:

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Recollections of Peter Matthiessen are coming in – and if they are anything like the profile published in the Times Magazine at the hour of his death, they will focus on the paradoxes of his career. He was a novelist known for his nonfiction, a well-born WASP drawn to adventures among…

Source: etr-gu
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Here Comes Everybody

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Yesterday I swapped messages and phone calls with a priest (Thomas Rosica) who is working with the papal spokesman in Rome; and when he finally reached me, he was en route to a “Francis Factor” event in Baltimore with Cardinal Sean O’Malley of Boston at Loyola University there. “They’ve…

Source: etr-gu
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"Brother, If You Focus on the Numbers, You're Missing the Story"

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Saturday Night Live — or was it Seth Meyers? — got in a jab the other night at CNN’s low ratings, but you don’t have to watch cable (it’s not part of my basic package) to get the news from this still-giant, still-ambitious news organization.

You can get it on the CNN website, in articles…

Source: etr-gu
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austinkleon:

The Happy Writer’s Flowchart

ayjay:

in response to Austin Kleon’s Miserable Artist Flowchart

This is great. Highly recommend Alan’s The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction, btw.

Source: ayjay
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He has called men of the cloth “vain” butterflies, “smarmy” idolators and “priest-tycoons.” He’s described some seminarians as potential “little monsters.”

Laurence England felt inspired by these conversations with clergy friends to compile a compendium of papal invective, calling it “The Pope Francis Little Book of Insults” – and, to his surprise, it kept growing monthly, weekly, even daily.

It is not a real book, of course. (This should have been obvious by the fact that I offered a 20% discount to anyone who directed one of the Pope’s insults at a bookstore cashier.)

But what began as a humorous blog post documenting the surprising things Pope Francis says has gained a large audience. (In time, he hope to have a Latin translation.)

Working backwards, he sifted through media reports, looking for all the Pope’s put downs and asking readers for assistance. He

was shocked by how many insults were directed toward Christians.

Indeed, the Pope has denounced the following: “sad Christians,” “pickled pepper-faced Christians,” “closed, sad, trapped Christians,” “pagan Christians,” “defeated Christians,” “liquid Christians,” “creed-reciting, parrot Christians,” and, finally, those “watered-down faith, weak-hoped Christians.”

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"What have we been robbed of, by his death? Not so much a movie star, I think, as somebody who took our dramatic taxonomy—all those lazy, useful terms by which we like to classify and patronize our performers, even the best ones—and threw it away. Leading man, character actor, supporting player: really, who gives a damn? Either you hold an audience, so tight that it feels lashed to the seats, or you don’t."

- Anthony Lane remembers Philip Seymour Hoffman: http://nyr.kr/1kw9EGu (via newyorker)

(via newyorker)

Source: newyorker.com
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A Higher Calling

How Philip Seymour Hoffman has worked himself into the greatest character actor of our time.

Source: The New York Times
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Happy Super Bowl Sunday, ya lushes. 

(via http://old-time-religion.blogspot.com/)

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(Graphic courtesy of PRRI)

(CNN) - Before he watches his beloved Denver Broncos in the Super Bowl this Sunday, Kyle Herman has some important rituals to perform.

Just as he has for years, in the morning he will pick out the Broncos jersey to wear for the game. He will slip on his high-school ring, refashioned in Broncos blue and orange, and surround his television with team paraphernalia, from signed footballs to a pillow.

Herman has several Broncos jerseys, and if a certain player is stinking up the field, the 21-year-old from Beaver Falls, Wisconsin, will put on that player’s jersey. You know, to give them a little more mojo.

“I don’t know why,” he says with a loud laugh, “but I feel like it really works for some reason.”

Herman may think his rituals are silly, but he’s far from alone in his sports superstitions.

According to a poll released in January by the Public Religion Research Institute, about half of all Americans believe that some element of the supernatural plays a role in sporting events.

That could mean fearing your team is cursed, as a quarter of sports fans said they do. It could mean you’re among the 26% who said they pray for God to help their team. Or it could mean performing rites like Herman, believing that, by some mysterious force, they will affect the outcome of the big game.

Robert P. Jones, the CEO of PRRI, said he wanted to explore the remarkable parallels between religion and sports: the tribalism, the loyalty, the uniforms, the lore, and, of course, the rituals.

Hearing people describe their game-day rites and customs, was eye-opening, Jones said with a wide smile.

“People were very very specific. They put on certain underwear, danced in little circles, gave their TVs a pep talk. Some of these things were playful and some were more serious.”

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